Troops in Anbar among 81 Killed across Iraq

Turkey deployed about 150 troops to Ba’shiqah, near Mosul. They are there allegedly to replace troops who were sent there over two years ago to help Kurdish forces. Baghdad has called the deployment of the troops an “incursion” and demanded Turkey withdraw them immediately.

White House spokesman Josh Ernest reassured the public that Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi has agreed to receive a small deployment of U.S. Special Forces. The premier’s issue in recent days has been talk of a deployment of 10,000 service members, which is untrue. What these Special Forces will do has yet to be decided.

The city of Kirkuk says it is owed nearly $1 billion in oil revenues it has not received since June 2013. Most of it is owed by Baghdad, but some of the oil was exported through Kurdistan, so the regional government is obliged to pay as well.

The number of mass graves found in Sinjar since the withdrawal of the Islamic State militants has risen to 16 in total, but could go higher. The total number of victims buried in them is unknown.

The United Nations expressed concern with reports that Kurdish forces have abused Sunni civilians in reclaimed territory. Much like Iraq’s regular forces and Shi’ite militiamen, the Kurds are accused of looting, destruction, kidnappings, and murder.

At least 81 were killed and 35 were wounded:

At least five suicide bombers attacked service members in Albu Aitha and Hamdhiya, killing 25 troops and wounding 23 more.

A fifth person was executed in Hawija. The executions of four others were reported yesterday.

In Baghdad, two militants were killed.

Twelve militants were killed in separate locations in Tal Afar.

Federal police killed a dozen militants in the Makhoul Mountains.

Police in Baiji killed 10 militants.

In Khalidiya, five militants were killed.

An airstrike killed four militants and wounded 12 more near Sinjar.

Three militants were killed in Husayba.

Security forces killed two suicide bombers targeting pilgrims in Madaen.

Read more by Margaret Griffis

Author: Margaret Griffis

Margaret Griffis is a journalist from Miami Beach, Florida and has been covering Iraqi casualties for Antiwar.com since 2006.