Iraq Attacks: 34 Killed, 109 Wounded

A series of bombs targeting Shi’ite neighborhoods in Baghdad left behind dozens of casualties. However, there was an unusually large number of smaller attacks across the country as well. This often happens when there is a significant attack or attacks in the capital, as overseas attention is focused back on Iraq. Overall, at least 34 Iraqis were killed and 109 more were wounded in thes violence.

Eleven people were killed and 47 more were wounded when two bombs exploded in Sadr City. At least one was targeting day laborers.

In Baghdad, three civilians were killed and at least 17 more were wounded during a car bombing in Shoala. A bomb in Hurriya left one dead and 13 wounded. Six people were wounded in an Adhamiya bombing. Six more were wounded during a bombing in Allawi.

A blast in Radwaniya wounded a Sahwa leader. Gunmen wounded an employee of the National Reconciliation Committee. Also, four children were liberated from their kidnappers.

Five family members were killed when bomb destroyed a policeman’s home in Abu Ghraib.

Bombs planted at two homes in Talhous killed three people and wounded four others when they were detonated.

A motorbike bomb planted near a theater in Ramadi killed two people and wounded three others. Near Ramadi, gunmen attacked a police station killing one policeman and wounding three more.

In Mosul, two Peshmerga and a gunman were killed in a clash. Gunmen killed a soldier.

An I.E.D. on a highway in Shirqat left one civilian dead and three more wounded.

A roadside bomb in Tuz Khormato killed a civilian. A policeman was killed while trying to defuse another bomb.

The body of a policeman was found in Islah, bearing gunshot wounds.

In Kirkuk, a sticky bomb wounded two police commissioners.

Two civilians were wounded in a hand grenade attack in Mussayab.

Mortar fire wounded a child near Baquba.

A car bomb left no casualties in Tal Afar.

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Author: Margaret Griffis

Margaret Griffis is a journalist from Miami Beach, Florida and has been covering Iraqi casualties for Antiwar.com since 2006.