Tuesday: 1 US Soldier, 22 Iraqis Killed; 12 Iraqis Wounded

Updated at 11:45 p.m. EST, Jan. 8, 2008

Tuesday saw a break from attacks; however, at least 24 Iraqis were killed or found dead and another 17 were wounded in light violence. Two Arabs were killed in Suleimaniya as well. Meanwhile, American troops staged a massive but secretive assault in Diyala province. Also, one American soldier was killed yesterday in Salman Pak.

In Baghdad, five dumped bodies were recovered. A roadside bomb blasted a Yarmouk council member, killing him and wounding two bodyguards. In Zaafaraniya, a national police colonel was killed as he sat in his car. Gunmen killed a deputy manager of a Mansour area tax office. No casualties were reported after a roadside bomb exploded near a U.S. patrol. Also, US troops raided a kindergarten in Sadr City.

In Mosul, a roadside bomb killed a civilian. Three dumped bodies were also recovered.

A suicide bomber in Madaen killed two policemen and wounded five others, including at least two civilians. Also, a mortar attack resulted in two wounded civilians.

A lawyer was accidentally killed in crossfire between police and gunmen in Kut.

Near Hilla, a former army officer was gunned down.

The corpses of two Arabs were found in Suleimaniya.

A woman was injured during an explosion in Muqdadiyah.

In Khaneqeen, gunmen wounded a civilian.

A bomb killed a woman at her home in Jalawla.

In Tikrit, a roadside bomb wounded three policemen.

A person was killed during a roadside bombing in Shura.

A police officer and his driver were kidnapped while traveling between Baghdad and Baquba.

Four suspects were killed during operations in Diyala province. U.S. sources arrested a taxi driver in Fallujah. Four suspects were detained in Baghdad. Iraqi police killed a gunman in Baghdad; three Iraqi soldiers were wounded during security operations.

 

Compiled by Margaret Griffis

Read more by Margaret Griffis

Author: Margaret Griffis

Margaret Griffis is a journalist from Miami Beach, Florida and has been covering Iraqi casualties for Antiwar.com since 2006.