Taiwan Arms Sales and the Erosion of US-Sino Diplomacy

Like everyone here, I feel honored to have had the opportunity to serve our country. I did so for three decades before entering the private sector a quarter century ago. I now chair a globally engaged business development company and the Committee for the Republic. I also lecture at Brown University’s Watson Institute, among other … Continue reading “Taiwan Arms Sales and the Erosion of US-Sino Diplomacy”

Why Israel Is Struggling To Find a Way Out of Its Political Deadlock

It would be a grave mistake to assume that the continuing political deadlock in Israel – with neither incumbent prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu nor his main rival Benny Gantz seemingly able to cobble together a coalition government – is evidence of a deep ideological divide. In political terms, there is nothing divided about Israel. In … Continue reading “Why Israel Is Struggling To Find a Way Out of Its Political Deadlock”

Tragic Folly: Supporting Death and Destruction in Yemen

Last year, in the Yemeni village of Dahyan, a Saudi airstrike targeted a bus of schoolboys on a field trip, killing 54. Forty-four were children. The Guardian and CNN identified the munition as an MK-82 (500 lb.) bomb; experts stated it was “a laser-guided Paveway, manufactured by the U.S. company Lockheed Martin,” one of the … Continue reading “Tragic Folly: Supporting Death and Destruction in Yemen”

One Year After Khashoggi’s Brutal Murder: Business as Usual?

Heinous. Savage. Ghastly. It’s hard to find the words to describe the act of luring journalist Jamal Khashoggi into a Saudi consulate in Istanbul, suffocating him, chopping him up and dissolving his bones. Yet a year later, governments and businesspeople around the world are eager to forgive and forget – or already have. So far, … Continue reading “One Year After Khashoggi’s Brutal Murder: Business as Usual?”

The Hypersonic Race to Hell

Originally posted at TomDispatch. My life, in a sense, has been an arms race. The atomic bomb was initially tested at Alamogordo, New Mexico, on July 15, 1945, five days short of my first birthday. Less than a month later, atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Although the Soviet Union didn’t conduct its … Continue reading “The Hypersonic Race to Hell”

A Picture (of a War Crime) Is Worth a Thousand Words

"I want no prisoners, I wish you to kill and burn, the more you kill and burn the better you will please me." – General Jacob Smith to subordinates on Samar Island during the Philippine-American War (1902) Not so long ago, in November 2010, I took command of B Troop, 4th Squadron, 4th US Cavalry … Continue reading “A Picture (of a War Crime) Is Worth a Thousand Words”