An Insider’s View of the International War Crimes Tribunal at the Hague

There follows extracts from a conversation with someone who has recently observed the Hague Tribunal at close quarters. The person’s name and the proceedings observed have not been revealed. As the following article makes clear, no one who has had any dealings with the tribunal can feel entirely sure that its tentacles will not wrap … Continue reading “An Insider’s View of the International War Crimes Tribunal at the Hague”

New World Order: The Bosnian Model

Congress flirted earlier this year with taking a more assertive role in determining U.S. policy in Kosovo and the other countries in the Balkans, but ultimately chose to stick with the pattern that has characterized most of the last several decades: Congress grumps and grouses from time to time but essentially leaves foreign policy to … Continue reading “New World Order: The Bosnian Model”

On State-Strengthening Wars: Part II

GETTING BACK TO THE SUBJECT… To recur, in a concrete way, to the relationship between war and heightened statism, let us now look at things from the standpoint of Martin Van Creveld’s The Rise and Decline of the State (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999). Van Creveld, a military historian who teaches at the Hebrew University … Continue reading “On State-Strengthening Wars: Part II”

Into a New Quagmire

The worst news of the week from a substantive perspective was the U.S. Senate’s approval of the vast bulk of the Clinton administration’s request for more money to conduct the misbegotten and unwinnable "drug war" in Colombia. The worst news from the perspective of what it says about our political culture and its watchfulness over … Continue reading “Into a New Quagmire”

On State-Strengthening Wars: Part I

In my last two columns on Murray Rothbard, I named a couple of books as important contributions to a Rothbardian analysis of the connections between statism and war. One is Martin Van Creveld’s The Rise and Decline of the State (1999), around which the Ludwig von Mises Institute is organizing a scholarly conference to take … Continue reading “On State-Strengthening Wars: Part I”

Murray N. Rothbard on States, War, and Peace: Part II

I promised last week to go further into what the late Murray Rothbard (1926-1995) teaches us about foreign policy, peace, and war. Those who keep up with such things will have noticed that there exists a colossal and ever-growing body of writing on "what Marx really meant." I wish these folks good luck. In a … Continue reading “Murray N. Rothbard on States, War, and Peace: Part II”

Who Could Deplore Peace Prospects?

I had called Leon Hadar, the libertarian Cato Institute‘s resident expert on the Middle East, to get some comments on the death of Syrian dictator-for-life Hafez-al-Assad, and he gave me plenty of information. But he kept pushing the conversation in a more interesting direction – namely, who is it these days who simply can’t stand … Continue reading “Who Could Deplore Peace Prospects?”

Murray N. Rothbard on States, War, and Peace: Part I

The sheer amount of writing done by the late Murray N. Rothbard (1926-1995) continues to astound. The quality of his work accounts for the impact it has had, and the attention it now draws, but its volume cannot have hurt, either. Rothbard spread the word about Austrian School economic theory, furthered those ideas, and helped … Continue reading “Murray N. Rothbard on States, War, and Peace: Part I”

Defending General McCaffrey

General Barry McCaffrey now has some defenders of the actions during the Persian Gulf war for which Seymour Hersh in the New Yorker had criticized him. The more usual approach has been to ignore the Hersh allegations and act as if they had no credibility or held no interest. However, while Mackubin Thomas Owens, a … Continue reading “Defending General McCaffrey”