Oppose The New Homeland Security Bureaucracy!

When the process of creating a Department of Homeland Security commenced, Congress was led to believe that the legislation would be a simple reorganization aimed at increasing efficiency, not an attempt to expand federal power. Fiscally conservative members of Congress were even told that the bill would be budget neutral! Yet, when the House of … Continue reading “Oppose The New Homeland Security Bureaucracy!”

Honoring Our Military Veterans

Although we honor veterans every November, the looming prospect of a second Gulf war makes this year especially meaningful for both our armed forces and those who served in past wars. Not surprisingly, many of the veterans I speak with in Texas urge caution in Iraq. Combat veterans understand perhaps better than any of us … Continue reading “Honoring Our Military Veterans”

Opposing the Use of Military Force Against Iraq

I oppose the resolution authorizing military force against Iraq. The wisdom of the war is one issue, but the process and the philosophy behind our foreign policy are important issues as well. But I have come to the conclusion that I see no threat to our national security. There is no convincing evidence that Iraq … Continue reading “Opposing the Use of Military Force Against Iraq”

Congress Must Say Yes or No to War

Last week, during a hearing in the House International Relations committee, I attempted to force the committee to follow the Constitution and vote to declare war with Iraq. The language of Article I, section 8, is quite clear: only Congress has the authority to declare war. Yet Congress in general, and the committee in particular, … Continue reading “Congress Must Say Yes or No to War”

Is Congress Relevant with Regards to War?

The last time Congress declared war was on December 11, 1941, against Germany in response to its formal declaration of war against the United States. This was accomplished with wording that took less than one-third of a page, without any nitpicking arguments over precise language, yet it was a clear declaration of who the enemy … Continue reading “Is Congress Relevant with Regards to War?”

Can We Afford This War?

A casual analysis of the world economy shows it rapidly deteriorating into recession, with a possible depression on the horizon. Unemployment is sharply rising with price inflation rampant, despite official government inflationary reports. The world’s stock markets continue to collapse, even after trillions of dollars in losses have been recorded in the past 2 years. … Continue reading “Can We Afford This War?”

War is a Political Mistake

I have for years advocated a moral and constitutional approach to our foreign policy. This has been done in the sincerest belief that a policy of peace, trade, and friendship with all nations is far superior in all respects to a policy of war, protectionism, and confrontation. But in the Congress I find, with regards … Continue reading “War is a Political Mistake”

Entangling Alliances Distort our Foreign Policy

As President Bush addressed the United Nations last week, I could not help thinking we have become incredibly mired in the "entangling alliances" another President George – George Washington – warned against. Sadly, many in Washington and the media seem to consider UN approval of our war plans far more important than a congressional debate … Continue reading “Entangling Alliances Distort our Foreign Policy”

Questions That Won’t Be Asked About Iraq

Soon we hope to have hearings on the pending war with Iraq. I am concerned there are some questions that won’t be asked – and maybe will not even be allowed to be asked. Here are some questions I would like answered by those who are urging us to start this war. 1. Is it … Continue reading “Questions That Won’t Be Asked About Iraq”

A Foreign Policy for Peace, Prosperity, and Liberty

Thomas Jefferson spoke for the founders and all our early presidents when he stated: “peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none…” which is, “one of the essential principles of our government”. The question is: Whatever happened to this principle and should it be restored? We find the 20th Century was … Continue reading “A Foreign Policy for Peace, Prosperity, and Liberty”