Iraq Bloodshed: 23 Killed, 39 Wounded in Numerous Attacks

At least 23 Iraqis were killed and 39 more were wounded in unusual violent activity. Most of the attacks were small, and none left more than 10 casualties. In Tarmiya, however, an unknown number of insurgents were also killed or wounded, so the figures could be much higher.

In Amiriyat al-Falluja, a bomb killed a girl and wounded six civilians, two of them children, as a police patrol passed near a school. Two policemen were killed and seven others were wounded in a separate bombing. A sticky bomb planted on a car wounded a councilman. 

In Baghdad, gunmen killed two policemen and wounded three others at a checkpoint in Zayouna. An attack at a checkpoint in Amil left two soldiers dead and three wounded. A brigadier general was killed in Amiriya. Police defused bombs in Za’afaraniya and Ghazaliya.

Three Kurdish policemen were killed and two more were wounded in a small arms attack at a checkpoint in Khanaqin. The attackers had also mined the area, so when nearby civilians rushed to help the policemen, three of them were injured when the mines exploded.

Near Buhriz, in Jawad Alpasho village, a gunman killed two soldiers and wounded three others. Military forces killed the gunman, who was described as an al-Qaeda leader, during a raid later in the day.

In Tarmiya, Baghdad Operations Command said a number of terrorists were killed or wounded when they failed to take a government building. At least one security member was killed and two more were wounded in this or a separate attack. A bomb killed two people.

In Falluja, three bodyguards were wounded when a bomb targeting the mayor’s convoy exploded. A sticky bomb killed a professor who is also an advisor for the Electricity Ministry.

In Mosul, a gunman killed a soldier and then was shot dead by other soldiers. 

A policeman was killed and four more were wounded during an assault on a checkpoint in Mukhisa.

Gunmen in Abu Saida killed one policeman and wounded two others.

A policeman was shot dead near Kirkuk.

Read more by Margaret Griffis

Author: Margaret Griffis

Margaret Griffis is a journalist from Miami Beach, Florida and has
been covering Iraqi casualties for Antiwar.com since 2006.