Dozens of Bodies Left on Mosul Streets; 207 Killed in Iraq

Military officials say that the Islamic State militants now occupy a tiny sliver of Mosul that is only 300 by 500 meters in size. However, residents of liberated neighborhoods claim that militants are still residing among them.

Iraqi forces launched an operation in Naft Khana, near Khanaqin.

About 1,000 people were sickened in Fallujah after chlorine was released at a water plant. Authorities have yet to determine if the “explosion” was an accident or terrorist-related.

Water flow into the Little Zab River in Kurdistan was increased. A newly built dam in Iran was the cause of a severe drop in levels recently.

At least 207 people were killed and 18 were wounded:

In Mosul, 50 bodies bearing gunshot wounds were discovered in Zanjili; another 24 bodies were also found. Seven female suicide bombers were killed. One bomber killed four people and wounded nine more. Two female suicide bombers killed a security officer and wounded several more. At least two other security personnel were killed by teenaged girl bombers. Militants burned to death three young men. At least 13 suicide bombers died yesterday. Security forces killed another 67 militants in battle.

A bomb killed three people and two were wounded in a bombing in Riyadh.

One person was killed and three were wounded during a blast at a fish market in Yusufiya.

In Arab Nuri, gunmen killed a soldier and wounded another.

Shelling supposedly launched from Iran wounded a shepherdess and two Peshmerga in Choman.

Several Peshmerga casualties were reported after clashes in Zarga.

Twelve militants were killed during operations in Nukhaib.

An air strike on an explosives factory in Hawija left 10 militants dead.

Five militants were killed in an airstrike in Kirkuk province.

Security forces killed three militants in Jazirat Albu Obeidi.

In Tal Afar, unknown assailants killed a militant who was responsible for designing ISIS/Daesh currency.

Read more by Margaret Griffis

Author: Margaret Griffis

Margaret Griffis is a journalist from Miami Beach, Florida and has
been covering Iraqi casualties for Antiwar.com since 2006.