Sunday: 28 Iraqis Killed, 10 Wounded

Updated at 7:15 p.m. EDT, Mar. 9, 2008

At least 28 Iraqis were killed and another 10 were wounded in the latest attacks. The U.S. military suggested that a recent surge in killings should not be taken as an overall return to violence. No Coalition deaths were reported.

Military authorities reported that many U.S. soldiers became ill after using contaminated water for bathing.

A grave containing six bodies was found near Khalis, only a day after a significant mass grave containing 100 very decomposed corpses was found there.

In Mosul, a car bomb killed two people and wounded five others. Gunmen shot dead a civilian. Also, a body was found.

Gunmen stormed a home in Iskandariya, where they killed a neighborhood supervisor and his son. Police later killed four gunmen.

A bomb attack in Tikrit left one policeman dead and three others wounded. Two other simultaneous blasts left no casualties.

A child playing with a roadside bomb was killed in Mussayab.

Mortar fire in Mahmudiya injured one child.

Four people were killed during a roadside bombing on a highway near Haditha.

Gunmen killed a civilian in Baquba.

Thirty-four suspects were captured in Karbala.

In Baghdad, two dumped bodies were recovered. In Zaafaraniyah, a pair of bombs left one dead and one injured. A roadside bombing in Karrada left no casualties. 13 wanted suspects were arrested.

Two bodies were found in Tal Afar. They belonged to a woman and her son.

A Mahdi Army commander was detained in Wassit province.

In Diyala province, security forces found a cache containing weapons and airplane parts.

Two men, described as a finance minister and an agricultural minister for al-Qaeda, were arrested in separate incidents.

Security officials said that the worsening crisis in Basra is due to an uncontrolled border with Iran.

 

Compiled by Margaret Griffis

Read more by Margaret Griffis

Author: Margaret Griffis

Margaret Griffis is a journalist from Miami Beach, Florida and has
been covering Iraqi casualties for Antiwar.com since 2006.