Why We Need a Congress That Cares About Foreign Policy

The U.S. Congress has power over two very important things: money and information. It can, in theory and practice, end a war by refusing to fund it. It can – and has – compelled the leading architects of American foreign policy – CIA directors, national security advisors, secretaries of defense – to answer for their … Continue reading “Why We Need a Congress That Cares About Foreign Policy”

Once Upon a Time, Congress Actually Fought Saudi Arms Deals. It Can Again.

“That should’ve happened so fast that Congress couldn’t step in.” These were the words of Democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen at February’s prestigious Munich Security Conference, in a panel discussion on whether President Obama should have used military force against the Syrian government in 2013. The senator’s comments succinctly capture the “don’t ask us” mantra that … Continue reading “Once Upon a Time, Congress Actually Fought Saudi Arms Deals. It Can Again.”

2017 Was a Banner Year for the Arms Industry

Arms companies have had a good year. The top 100 learned in July that their annual revenues amounted to a healthy $364.8 billion, with American companies – as usual – dominating. While the military itself has suffered several calamities – the apparent murder of a Green Beret by two Navy SEALs in Mali in June, … Continue reading “2017 Was a Banner Year for the Arms Industry”

The US Is Stockpiling Nuclear Arms, and the Cost Is Astonishing

Overwhelmed with stories of high-level indictments, intrigues, investigations, and scandals, the American public can be forgiven for missing revelations about an issue of some importance: our nuclear weapons. Thanks to an October 31 report by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), we now have a 30-year outline of both the kinds of destructive weaponry we are … Continue reading “The US Is Stockpiling Nuclear Arms, and the Cost Is Astonishing”